glutenfreebymarriage

April 10, 2013

Southwest American Chop Suey

Filed under: dinner, freezer friendly, gluten-free, lunch — Tags: , — glutenfreebymarriage @ 12:38

Southwest style American Chop Suey

Improvisation can be a good thing

Sometimes, no matter how organized you think you are, not everything gets on the shopping list.

Case in point, the plan was to make American Chop Suey for Mr. GF’s lunches and a double batch of spaghetti so that I could freeze half for later, but somehow I only bought enough tomatoes for the spaghetti.

I really didn’t want to go back to the store for one can of tomatoes so I looked in the cupboard for something I could substitute, but the only thing I saw was one lone jar of emergency salsa.  Why not?

Southwest American Chop Suey

Ingredients:

Makes about 5 2-cup servings

  • 1 pound lean ground turkey
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 medium green pepper, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 28-ounce can whole tomatoes, hand crushed
  • 1 8-ounce can tomato sauce
  • 1 24-ounce jar Southwest Style Salsa
  • 1 – 2 tablespoons brown sugar*
  • 3 cups uncooked brown rice penne pasta (about 6 servings)
  • chile powder
  • ground cumin
  • oregano
  • garlic powder
  • onion powder

*I usually add a bit of brown sugar to help cut the acidity when I make a dish with a lot of tomatoes.

Directions:

  1. Bring a pot of water to boil, cook pasta according to package directions.
  2. Brown ground turkey in a large pan, add onions, garlic and green peppers cooking until onions are translucent.

    Note: I used 94% lean ground turkey because it was on sale.  If you are using beef or meat with a higher fat content you may need to drain excess grease from the pan.

  3. Add tomatoes, tomato sauce, salsa, brown sugar and spices.
  4. Cook over medium heat until most of the liquid is evaporated.  (Between the canned tomatoes, salsa and tomato sauce there is a lot of liquid, it took me about 45 minutes to cook it down to the point where it was still moist but not completely soupy.)
  5. Add cooked pasta and stir until well blended.

This turned out really well.  Very spicy (I added a lot of chile powder) with a depth of flavor.   I think the salsa with the corn and black beans took this cafeteria staple to a new level and I will definitely make it again.

If you leave out the pasta, this would be a nice freezer friendly meal.

January 29, 2013

Chunky Split Pea Soup (It ain’t pretty but it sure is good!)

Filed under: dairy free, dinner, gluten-free, soup/stew — Tags: , , , — glutenfreebymarriage @ 13:26

chunky split pea soup

Close your eyes and the gently bubbling soup with its wafting smokey aroma will lure you down the hall towards the stove top but whatever you do, DO NOT OPEN THE LID!!!

Don’t worry, lifting the lid will not affect the soup, but the muddy looking green mush will likely turn your stomach, or at the very least make you wrinkle your nose and say “Ewwww.”

There is no getting around it.  Split Pea Soup falls into the same category as oatmeal and a few other mushy, unattractive foods.  It smells great, tastes great, is extremely good for you, but boy is it ugly.

If you can get past its appearance, this recipe has a wonderful thickness that belies its lack of meat and a hint of smokiness that is just the right touch to warm your winter blues.   Setting aside the unseemly color,  it’s an easy recipe that packs a lot of flavor and is well worth trying.  And yes, the picture is accurate.  The color of the soup is exactly how it looked when we ate it last night.

The recipe below is shown as it was originally written. The items highlighted in yellow are the ingredients that I changed.

Split Pea Soup (What’s For Dinner? 365 Lean & Natural Dinners, p. 28)

ingredients:

Makes 6 servings

  • 1lb dried green or yellow split peas
  • 6 cups low-sodium chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons soft margarine
  • 1 whole clove
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 stalk celery with leaves, chopped
  • 1 small clove garlic, minced
  • 1 medium carrot, chopped
  • 1 small potato, unpeeled and diced
  • 1 cup diced cook chicken (optional)
  • grated Parmesan cheese

Changes:

2 tablespoons soft margarine: I didn’t see the point of the margarine so I skipped it.

1 stalk celery with leaves, chopped: The leaves on the celery I had left in the fridge were looking a little limp so I just went with the stalk.

1 cup diced cooked chicken: It was optional and I didn’t have time to thaw frozen chicken and cook it so I opted out.

grated Parmesan cheese: Dairy, need I say more?

spices:  I also added 1/2 teaspoon of dried mustard and cinnamon to the pot.

Other Changes:

I used boxed chicken broth and didn’t want to leave 1/2 a box open in the fridge so I increased the broth from six to eight cups and to make up for the extra liquid I also doubled the celery, carrots and potatoes.

Directions:

  1. Wash and sort the peas.  Put in a 6-quart soup pot with the remaining ingredients except the chicken.  Bring to a boil.
  2. Reduce heat, cover pot and simmer for 2 – 3 hours, stirring occasionally.    All the vegetables should be very soft and begin to fall apart.  The thicker part of the soup will tend to sink to the bottom of the pan and should be stirred in before serving.
  3. Stir in the chicken or turkey about 5 minutes before serving.  Garnish with the cheese.

That was pretty much it.  Another of those not so pretty, but oh so tasty meals.  I’m not a big pea fan, but this was an easy meal on a cold and snowy day and made a nice change from my usual lentils or black beans  You could take an immersion blender and puree the whole thing, but the idea of a muddy green puddle in my soup bowl wasn’t too appetizing so I left it chunky.  (It’s much easier to overlook the color when you can make out the potatoes and carrots.)

Also, the stirring really needed some more emphasis in the original recipe.  I got side tracked with work and found that the peas sank to the bottom and stuck to the pot.  I managed to incorporate them back into the soup with some aggressive scraping/stirring, but it was a gunky, clumpy mess.

Note: This is something that could be put in a slow cooker on low for 6 hours.  It could also be made vegetarian by swapping the chicken broth for vegetable broth.  If you can get past the appearance it’s an inexpensive hearty meal with a surprising amount of flavor and I strongly recommend that you give it a try.

January 23, 2013

Chicken and Mushroom Stew

Filed under: chicken, dinner, gluten-free — Tags: , — glutenfreebymarriage @ 13:27

chicken and mushroom stew over white rice

The recipe below is shown as it was originally written. The items highlighted in yellow are the ingredients that I changed.

Chicken and Mushroom Stew (Prevention Guide Slow Cooker Recipes 2006, p.9)

ingredients:

Makes 4 servings

  • 1 10 3/4 oz can 98% fat-free cream of mushroom soup + half a soup can of water
  • 4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves, cut into 2″ chunks
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 pound mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 cup baby carrots
  • 2 ribs celery, sliced
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

Additions:

  • 2 cups uncooked brown or white rice

Changes:

1 10 3/4 oz can 98% fat-free cream of mushroom soup + half a soup can of water: The only gf cream of mushroom soup that I can find locally is Progresso Creamy Mushroom soup.  The Progresso is a much larger can, 18 oz, and is not condensed so I just used the soup and skipped the additional 1/2 can of water.

Note: Progresso’s Creamy Mushroom soup is not a great substitute when you need a thick condensed cream of mushroom soup but does work in this recipe because the directions call for half a can of water to dilute.

4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves:  I probably would have spent the extra money on boneless, skinless chicken breasts if they were going to be served as chicken breasts, but I’m too cheap poor to spend $3.99 a pound for something that is going to be chopped up.  I used about 1 3/4 pounds of boneless thighs and didn’t bother to cut them into bite size pieces.  (They fell apart into smaller pieces during the cooking process.)

1 cup baby carrots: Really?  Yes, baby carrots are cute on an appetizer tray, but I can’t rationalize the extra cost just so it looks cute in a stew.  I used the carrots I had on hand and chopped them into three inch pieces.  I would much rather spend the extra money on organic carrots.  There is a noticeable enough taste difference between organic and non-organic carrots that it’s worth the extra money.  (It also makes me wonder what other veg taste like when they are not covered in pesticides, etc…)

spices:  I also added 1/2 teaspoon of rosemary and sage to the pot.

Directions:

  1. Combine soup and water in slow cooker.
  2. Sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper.  Place in slow cooker.
  3. Add mushrooms, carrots, celery and garlic powder.  Stir gently to mix.
  4. Cover and cook on low 6 – 8 hours.
  5. Cook rice according to package directions and set aside.
  6. Serve chicken stew over cooked rice.

This isn’t the prettiest looking meal I’ve ever put on the table, but most things that come out of a slow cooker aren’t.   It was easy, convenient and tasted pretty good.  The only change I would make would be to add a little more salt next time.

Thoughts on Creamy Condensed Soups

One of the problems with trying to cook gluten free is that many of the fast & easy casseroles rely on condensed soup for structure (glue) and moisture and there are no gluten free condensed soups.

There are quite a few excellent recipes online for making a homemade condensed soup base that you can whip out to make your own gluten free condensed soup, but they are mostly dairy based and as Mr. GF is also Mr. Lactose Intolerant it’s not really a great improvement.  I could substitute soy powder for the powdered milk called for in most of the recipes, but Mr. GF’s grandmother died of breast cancer and I am leery of putting too much soy in his diet.

Since condensed soups seem to be more about consistency than taste (a salty gelatinous flour and water paste) I’m thinking that mashed potatoes or cauliflower with a smidgeon of broth might do the trick.  It could always be thickened with potato or corn starch.    Even better, I’m wondering if I could make a mix from mashed potato flakes, powdered bouillon and potato starch.   What do you think?

I’m thinking that it sounds really easy and that I should probably give it a try.

August 13, 2012

The real cost of eating gluten & dairy free(ish)

Filed under: Cooking Light, dairy free, dessert, dinner, gelato, gluten-free, menu planning, Uncategorized — glutenfreebymarriage @ 20:10

We all know the drill.   Healthy food is too expensive, cooking is too much trouble and living gluten free is a million times worse.   Not only is the selection of gluten free alternatives both limited and even more expensive, but having to make meals without all those convenience foods (pre-made marinades, dressings, broths, etc…) makes cooking even more of a chore.  My response is hogwash.

My food bill for this week was $47.68 and included seven days worth of breakfast, lunch and dinner for two as well as ingredients to make chocolate chip muffins and a dairy-free version of passion fruit mango gelato, and a few pantry replenishment items such as flax and sugar.  All of the food is gluten free, most is dairy free and the meal plan is for fast, easy summer dishes that most people would enjoy and everyone could make.

Breakfasts: oatmeal with unsweetened applesauce and ground flax

Snack: gluten free chocolate chip muffins

Lunch: German Bologna (yes, the label says gluten free) and American Cheese Sandwich (Ok, processed lunch meat is not generally considered healthy, but Mr. GF likes it and I hurt my back bad enough that I can’t spend too much time on my feet right now, so he gets a sandwich.)

Dinners: Since most recipe feed 4 – 6 people and there are only two of us, we generally get two meals out of a recipe.

Sunday/Monday: Summer Vegetable Stew with Basil Puree (from cookinglight.com)

Tuesday/Wednesday: Greek Tuna Wraps

Thursday/Friday: Grilled Hamburgers with Oven Fries


I meant to post this a couple weeks ago but I hurt my back and it seemed to get worse rather than better as the week wore on and it didn’t happen.  The good news is that except for the hamburgers we did manage to stick to the menu plan that week, even with me more or less flat on my back.   (No way I was going to be able to clean the grill so I substituted a hash with some leftover cooked ham I had in the freezer. )

In this case having a meal plan really made a difference.  We had all the ingredients on hand so that Mr. GF could help with the cooking without having to run to the store or break from the GF/DF diet.

July 17, 2012

Black Bean Taco Salad with Lime Vinaigrette

Filed under: chicken, Cooking Light, dairy free, dinner, gluten-free — Tags: , , — glutenfreebymarriage @ 13:16

Black Bean Taco Salad with Lime Vinaigrette

Back in the day, long before we knew about gluten or lactose intolerance, we used to rely on Cooking Light Magazine for a lot of our menu inspiration.   It was easy, had lots of great pictures and usually had a nice balance of recipes.

In an effort to get out of our menu rut and show that it’s not that difficult to tweak a published recipe to work for gluten/lactose intolerance I’ve decided to start posting some of the old Cooking Light recipes, starting with Black Bean Taco Salad with Lime Vinaigrette.

Heads Up: The recipe below is as it appeared on page 112 of the July 2000 edition of Cooking Light Magazine.  The items highlighted in yellow are the ingredients that I changed.

Vinaigrette Ingredients:

Makes 8 servings

  • 1/4 cup chopped seeded tomato
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon grated lime rind
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled

Salad Ingredients:

  • 8 cups thinly sliced iceberg lettuce
  • 1 1/2 cups chopped ready-to-eat roasted skinned, boned chicken breasts (about 2)
  • 1 cup chopped tomato
  • 1 cup chopped green bell pepper
  • 1 cup finely diced red onion
  • 1/2 cup (2 ounces) shredded reduced fat sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1 (15-ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 4 cups fat free baked tortilla chips (about 4 ounces)
Changes:

Vinaigrette:

fresh cilantro: substituted about 1 tablespoon of dried cilantro

Salad:

1 1/2 cups chopped ready-to-eat roasted chicken:  baked my own chicken, substituted legs

1 cup finely diced red onion: substituted 1 small can black olives

1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese: Mr. GF is lactose intolerant, but I don’t like soy cheddar (tastes like Velveeta to me and I hate Velveeta) so instead of adding cheese directly to the salad, we sprinkled about a tablespoon of grated soy substitute on his dish and regular grated cheddar on mine.

baked tortilla chips: gf baked corn chips

soy substitute sour cream: sour cream wasn’t in the original recipe, but we had an open container of soy sour cream so we added a dollop (teaspoon) to the top of the salad.

Directions:

  1. Combine vinaigrette ingredients in blender or food processor and process until smooth.  (I used my stick/immersion blender)
  2. Combine all salad ingredients except tortilla/corn chips in large bowl.  Add vinaigrette and toss until salad is well coated.  As noted above, I added the cheese to the individual servings rather than tossing it with the salad.
  3. To serve, place individual servings on chilled salad plates, top with grated cheese and dollop of sour cream.  Tuck tortilla/corn chips around edges of plate.

Overall, nice salad on a hot day, particularly if you use store bought roasted chicken.   With the exception of the lime, we usually have all these ingredients on hand so even though it’s too much for two people to eat, I would recommend it as an easy recipe if you have drop in dinner guests.

June 27, 2012

Pat’s Pot Roast #2

Filed under: beef, cooking, dinner, gluten-free, pot roast, Uncategorized — glutenfreebymarriage @ 20:05

Did I mention that I don’t care for beef?

It’s no secret that I would never be the poster child for the beef council.  I don’t have a particular moral issue with it, I just don’t don’t like the texture or the way it tastes.   Unfortunately, beef seems to be the one thing that is regularly on sale and when you are trying to balance a dwindling food budget and accommodate a very expensive gluten free diet, you sometimes have to face the choice of eating things that you don’t like.

Last summer I suffered through weekly steaks, this past winter it was pot roasts.  Needless to say I have been forced to come up with a variety of pot roast recipes that are easy to cook, tasty enough for my non-beef-loving palate and of course, gluten free.

Ingredients:

  • *2 – 3 pound roast
  • 5.5 oz can tomato juice
  • 1 cup beef broth
  • 1 tablespoon beef broth
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce
  • 2 tablespoons Soy Sauce
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons dried minced onion
  • thyme, rosemary, salt and pepper to taste
  • onions, quartered
  • carrots, peeled and cut into large pieces
  • potatoes, cut into large pieces
  • 2 tablespoons corn starch
  • 1 cup beef broth

* Most recipes call for a 3 – 4 pound roast, but since there are only two of us and I don’t really like beef, I usually buy one between 2 1/2 – 2 3/4 pounds.  This recipe works fine for a larger roast without making any changes.

Also, I am not picky when it comes to cut of meat.  Top round, bottom round, shoulder round or chuck, it doesn’t matter.  Whatever is on sale is what gets put in the pan.  It would have to be an extraordinarily tough piece of meat not to spend several hours cooking in liquid to not end up tender.

Directions:

Preheat oven to 3500

  1. In a small bowl whisk tomato juice, beef broth, Worcestershire, soy sauce, brown sugar and minced onions and set aside.
  2. Heat a large dutch oven on the stovetop.  While pan is warming, rub spices on roast and set aside.  Add oil to pan and brown meat on all sides.  Remove from heat.
  3. Pour tomato/broth mixture over meat in dutch oven.  Cover and roast meat approximately 3 hours.  (1 hour per pound.)  If you don’t have a dutch oven you can transfer the roast from your frying pan to a large casserole dish or roasting pan and cover with foil.
  4. Add vegetables to pan during the last hour of cooking.
  5. Once meat is cooked and vegetables are tender remove from pan oven and reserving liquid (in the pan), place meat and vegetables on serving platter and cover with foil.
  6. Return pan with remaining liquid to the stovetop.
  7. In a small bowl stir 2 tablespoons of corn starch into  1 cup of beef broth until dissolved.
  8. Add corn starch/beef broth mixture to the dutch oven, cook on medium heat until the liquid thickens, stirring frequently.  Try not to let the gravy boil.  The gravy usually takes about 15 – 20 minutes, though I have had to let it go as long as a half an hour.

There you are.  A super easy, budget friendly, just like Grandma used to cook, old fashioned pot roast.  Okay, so my grandmother didn’t actually cook much, but her dad owned a butcher shop and she did like a nicely cooked piece of meat.  And with pot roasts on sale every week week for about $1.89 a pound you are looking at a pretty substantial meal for about $2.50 a serving.  In case you are wondering, the pot roast and vegetables in the picture will go two dinners and one to two lunches in our house.  Not too shabby.  (It’s also not fully cooked…I took the picture when I added the veg, but didn’t have time to get another shot when it was done.)

May 29, 2012

Easy Gluten Free Stir Fry (chicken, pork, beef or vegetarian)

Filed under: dinner, gluten-free, lunch, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , , — glutenfreebymarriage @ 13:58

We love stir fry!

Have an extra chicken leg or spare pork chop?  Make stir fry!  Did you buy the family pack of steaks?  That tiny one that nobody eats makes a great addition to stir fry.  Did you go crazy at the farmer’s market?  Don’t let all that fresh veg go to waste, make stir fry!

In case you can’t tell, we love stir fry!  It’s fast, is a great way to use leftovers and is easy to stretch for a week of gluten-free lunches.   The only caveat is that you have to be really careful and read your labels.   Sauces and stocks are favorite hiding places for gluten, and just because a company didn’t list wheat on the label the last time you bought it doesn’t mean that they haven’t changed the formula.  (Ask me how I know…)

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups uncooked rice (brown or white)
  • 4 cups cold water
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • *1 cup meat (chicken/pork/beef), cubed
  • 3 – 4 small carrots, julienned
  • 1 medium green pepper, thinly sliced
  • 1 medium red pepper, thinly sliced
  • 1 medium onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 cups of pea pods
  • 1 cup mushrooms, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons low sodium soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth (substitute beef broth for beef)
  •  **ginger, garlic, onion powder to taste

*A few thoughts on meat: Meat is an optional ingredient, if you prefer vegetarian, then omit the meat.  (You’ll want to use vegetable broth in place of chicken broth as well.)  Also, meat can be previously cooked, as in leftovers, or raw.

**Fresh ginger and garlic add a wonderful, robust flavor to this dish but can easily be substituted with powdered versions.  If you have fresh ginger and garlic on hand simply add them to the pan with the onions, otherwise, wait until the end to shake over the cooked veg.

Directions:

  1. Add water, rice and a pinch of salt to a medium sauce pan and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat, cover with  tight-fitting lid and simmer 20 minutes until liquid is absorbed.  Remove from heat and set aside.
  2. Heat large fry pan, wok or dutch oven and add oil.
  3. If using previously cooked meat proceed to step 4, otherwise saute meat until no longer pink.
  4. Add carrots, onions, red and green peppers to pan, continue cooking on medium heat until onions are softened.  If you are using fresh ginger or garlic add to pan now.
  5. Stir in pea pods, mushrooms, soy sauce, chicken broth and remaining spices.  Add meat if using leftovers and continue cooking until liquid is mostly absorbed.
  6. Spread cooked rice on a serving platter and top with meat/veg mixture.  You can also just add the rice to veg mixture in the pan.  It’s not as pretty, but if you are using it for lunches it will be easier to measure out into daily servings if the meat/veg/rice is already mixed.

Note: Total cook time is about 30 minutes.

Substitutes: You can substitute any veg in season or on hand.   (Broccoli works great but is messy!)  Rice noodles also make a great alternative to plain rice.

 

February 20, 2012

Easy GF Pepperoni & Onion Pizza

Filed under: dinner, gluten-free, pizza — glutenfreebymarriage @ 19:17

homemade gluten free pizza

Now that I’ve complained about the expensive, not-so-gluten-free restaurant pizza, I am going to share my easy to make at home version.

This recipe uses a biscuit crust and is reminiscent of the Jiffy box crusts my mother used to make when I was little.  It’s not quite the same as a real yeast based pizza crust, but it’s pretty good and the entire pizza only takes about 15 minutes of prep time.

One small warning before you start.  The dough portion of this recipe is very sticky and extremely messy.  My kitchen is too small to keep the appliances I don’t use regularly, so I use my hand to mix the wet and dry ingredients, but if you have a convenient food processor you might want to use it.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup brown rice flour
  • 1/2 cup potato starch
  • 1/4 cup corn starch
  • 1 3/4 teaspoons xanthan gum
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 5 tablespoons cold butter, cut into small pieces
  • 3/4 cup buttermilk*
  • 8 ounce can tomato sauce
  • spices to taste (garlic powder, onion powder, oregano and red pepper flakes)
  • 12 pieces Hormel Turkey Pepperoni or toppings of your choice
  • 3/4 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

*I usually just make sour milk (mix splash of lemon juice and enough regular milk to equal what the recipe calls for).

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375o.
  2. Prepare a pizza pan by lining with parchment and coating with cooking spray.
  3. Combine all the dry ingredients, brown rice flour through bakMr. GF mixing buttermilk into flouring soda, in a medium bowl and mix until well blended.
  4. Drop chilled butter into the flour mix and use a pastry blender work the butter into the flour.  Mix only until the dough resembles coarse crumbs.  About 10 or 12 pulses with a food processor.
  5.  Pour the buttermilk over the flour/butter mixture and mix until the milk has been incorporated.  If you are using your hand like me, just turn on the cold water and keep re-wetting your hand as the dough starts to stick to your fingers.  If you’re using a food processor do about 10 pulses until the dough comes together in a wet ball.smoothing dough in pan
  6. No matter how you mixed the dough this step will get your hands dirty.  Wet your hands in cold water (you might want to leave the faucet on for this) and plop the dough in the middle of the prepared pizza pan.  Using your hands gently press and smooth the dough until it is spread evenly in the pan.  If I am home alone I use one hand to hold the pan and press and smooth with the other.  If Mr. GF is here, then one of us holds while the other uses both hands to spread the dough.  The thing to remember is that you have to keep your hands wet or the dough will stick and pull back from the pan.  It might be a little frustrating the first time you try this, but the dough is very forgiving and if you keep re-wetting your hands you should be able to get a nice even crust.pizza with toppings
  7. Once you are happy with the crust, pop it into the oven and bake 20 minutes at 375o.  The crust should be a light golden brown color when it is done.
  8. When the crust is done remove it from the oven and change the temperature to 425o.
  9. It’s time to start assembling your fabulous homemade gluten free pizza.  Spread the tomato sauce across the surface of the pizza crust and sprinkle your favorite seasonings.  We made a classic pepperoni pizza so we used onion powder, garlic powder, oregano and red pepper flakes, but you can tailor your spices to match the toppings.
  10. Next add the toppings and cover with cheese.
  11. Bake for 12 minutes at 425o.

Final thoughts.  Now that you’ve made your easy to make, homemade gluten free pizza, consider the possibilities.  We used Hormel Turkey Pepperoni for this pizza because it is gluten free and I wanted to show that you can avoid gluten and do a traditional topping, but you can use anything.  Some of our favorites are veggie, balsamic chicken or a basic kitchen sink variety with whatever leftovers are in the fridge.

I should also mention that I have tried making and freezing the crust ahead with so-so results.  It’s okay, but not great.  It might be better if I had one of those pizza crisper pans, but I found that it’s just a bit too soggy to freeze and reheat in a regular pan.

This is a really easy recipe that requires no special skills or equipment.  Please give it a try, I would love to hear how it works for you.

Pat

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